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Asia Unbound

CFR fellows and other experts assess the latest issues emerging in Asia today.

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Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang shake hands before a ceremony in Canberra, Australia. David Gray/Reuters

Beijing’s Influence Sparks Regional Concern

Over the past year, both the Australian and New Zealand governments have faced reports that the Chinese government has gained influence within their political systems, universities, and media markets. So far only Canberra has responded firmly. Read More

December 8, 2017

Southeast Asia
The Trump Administration Takes Action Against the Hun Sen Government

Over the past year, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen and his ruling party have gone from simply repressing civil society and opposition parties to taking steps that are creating a fully authoritarian, one-party state. These steps have included jailing co-opposition leader Kem Sokha for treason, tossing multiple NGOs out of the country, overseeing the shutdown of multiple independent radio and print outlets, and, ultimately, presiding over the dissolution of the main opposition party. There now appears little chance that Cambodia’s 2018 national elections will be free and fair.

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December 8, 2017

South Korea
How the United States, ASEAN, and South Korea Could Cooperate on Nontraditional Security

Traditional security issues in the Asia-Pacific, such as tensions on the Korean Peninsula or disputes over the South China Sea, consistently attract the attention of policymakers within the region and abroad. But their consequences for ordinary people are often dwarfed by the fallout from nontraditional security (NTS) events, such as climate change, infectious diseases, natural disasters, irregular migration, famine, people smuggling, drug trafficking, and maritime safety.

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December 8, 2017

China
Podcast: Eradicating Poverty in China—An Impossible Task?

Despite sweeping reforms that have reduced rural poverty by 94 percent since 1980, more than 43 million people in China still live below the poverty line. To combat the widening income gap, the Chinese government established programs like the dibao, an income subsidy for the nation’s poorest that many still rely on as their primary source of income.

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