Asia Unbound
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Asia Unbound

CFR fellows and other experts assess the latest issues emerging in Asia today.

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Australia’s Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull shakes hands with his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi during a photo opportunity ahead of their meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, India, April 10, 2017. Adnan Abidi/Reuters

Australia Wants to Boost Economic Ties With India

As the United States places emphasis on the “Indo-Pacific”—a term echoed by Japan, India, Australia, and others—the framework of the “Quad,” a consultation involving these four democracies in the region, has come to the fore. Australia-India ties are weaker than the bilateral ties between other Quad countries, so this is a relationship that has ample room to grow.     Read More

July 11, 2018

Southeast Asia
Najib Has Been Arrested—Now What?

Earlier this month, the Malaysian government arrested former Prime Minister Najib tun Razak on charges of corruption and criminal breaches of trust, in allegations related to the 1MDB state fund scandal. The charges were brought swiftly; the new Malaysian government has been in office less than two months, after winning elections in May that turned in part on voter anger at the perceived high levels of graft in Najib’s administration. 

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July 11, 2018

Southeast Asia
The Thai Junta Wins Back the World

More than four years after Thailand’s military seized power in a coup, the nineteenth coup or coup attempt in the kingdom since the end of the absolute monarchy in 1932, the country still seems far from a return to civilian rule. Since the coup, junta leader Prayuth Chan-ocha has repeatedly promised that elections will be held, only to put them off once again.

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July 9, 2018

Asia
Beyond “Mateship”: Tough Choices in Australian Foreign Policy

By James Curran In recent weeks, the Australian government has invested significant commemorative capital to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Hamel on the Western Front in World War I in July 1918. This was the first time that Australian and U.S. troops had fought alongside each other—a practice subsequently seen in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and more recently in Afghanistan and Iraq. Few, if any, close U.S. allies can boast that kind of record in fighting alongside U.S. troops repeatedly.

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