from Asia Unbound

Beijing’s Influence Sparks Regional Concern

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang shake hands before a ceremony in Canberra, Australia. David Gray/Reuters

December 13, 2017

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang shake hands before a ceremony in Canberra, Australia. David Gray/Reuters
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

More on:

China

Australia

New Zealand

Over the past year, both the Australian and New Zealand governments have faced reports that the Chinese government has gained influence within their political systems, universities, and media markets. So far only Canberra has responded firmly. Australia’s domestic intelligence agency [ASIO] wrote in its annual report to parliament this year that it believed foreign governments are trying to extend their influence (pdf) into Australian society, posing “a threat to our sovereignty, the ­integrity of our national institutions and the exercise of our citizens’ rights.”

Beijing’s influence campaign within Australian and New Zealand domestic politics also may be a sign of the future. For more on China’s apparent influence strategy in Australia and New Zealand, and its relevance to Beijing’s increasingly assertive attempts to wield power within other states, read my new Expert Brief.

More on:

China

Australia

New Zealand

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close