from Asia Unbound

Thailand’s Election: Not Much Reason for Optimism

Thailand's King Maha Vajiralongkorn attends the annual Royal Ploughing Ceremony in central Bangkok, Thailand, on May 14, 2018. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

February 22, 2019

Thailand's King Maha Vajiralongkorn attends the annual Royal Ploughing Ceremony in central Bangkok, Thailand, on May 14, 2018. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters
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Southeast Asia

Thailand

Democracy

Elections and Voting

After nearly five years under a junta, Thailand will hold national elections on March 24. They could be a turning point for a country that has been considered one of the most stable states in Southeast Asia despite weathering nearly two decades of political strife. It is more likely, though, that the elections will further entrench rule by the military and an increasingly assertive monarchy at a time when many Southeast Asian democracies are failing. For more on why the elections could lead to further instability—or even outright conflict again—see my new CFR article.

More on:

Southeast Asia

Thailand

Democracy

Elections and Voting

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