from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

Women Could Boost the Global Economy, But Outdated Laws Are Holding Them Back

Employees assemble an engine at the production line of an automobile company in Anhui province, China. July 16, 2009. Jianan Yu/REUTERS

January 16, 2019

Employees assemble an engine at the production line of an automobile company in Anhui province, China. July 16, 2009. Jianan Yu/REUTERS
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In the midst of the longest U.S. government shutdown in history, members of Congress have found a rare area of bipartisan cooperation: women's economic empowerment.

Last week, President Trump signed into law the Women's Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment (WEEE) Act, a law that strengthens U.S. efforts to promote opportunity for female entrepreneurs worldwide. At a time when bipartisanship is elusive, elected officials on both sides of the aisle agree on one thing: Women's economic participation is a worthwhile investment.

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Women and Economic Growth

Economics

U.S. Congress

Read the full article on CNN Business Perspectives >>

More on:

Women and Women's Rights

Women and Economic Growth

Economics

U.S. Congress

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